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SCIENTIFIC- FROM EVOLUTION TO STRING THEORY

http://groups.blackplanet.com/scientific

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  • Members: 460
  • Category: Science
  • Type: public
  • Date Founded:
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Description

After checking out the Science section of BP, found it seriously lacking. So, decided to create a group dedicated to science. Mostly there will be postings and links about recent scientific finds or theories. Debates are welcome. Or for those interested, simply read.


Forum Topic Posts Topic Creator Last Post
Will we ever get a TOE?
1
ACCOUNT CLOSED


ACCOUNT CLOSED


Bisexual Single Dating
1
jodielee


jodielee


Getting Tired of the planet?
4
geneticmemory


geneticmemory


Space Travel and the relative distances between Star systems using conventional space travel speeds vs. Space time compression/Worpdrive,Wormholes.
3
AUSAR-2


AUSAR-2


Challenge to the Hebrew Israelites/"African Americans"
1
dlionking777


dlionking777


What's Your Field of Study /or/ Interest...
6
SwiftTiff2


captblackman


the higgs bolson....
1
dondagriot


dondagriot


What is the state of nothingness, the supreme state of God?
3
hotep3amun


lindleysmith


Tiny vibrating strands of energy
6
AUSAR-2


lindleysmith


Death Is The Road To Awe
3
PKat
  • May 28, 2011 by:
  • PKat


jerjack700


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Announcements (107)
sincere1906

sincere1906

Neanderthals and Early Humans May Not Have Mingled Much

By NICHOLAS WADE
May 9, 2011

An improvement in the dating of fossils suggests that the Neanderthals, a heavily muscled, thick-boned human species adapted to living in ice age Europe, perished almost immediately on contact with the modern humans who started to enter Europe from the Near East about 44,000 years ago. Until now bones from several Neanderthal sites have been dated to as young as 29,000 years ago, suggesting there was extensive overlap between the two human species. This raised the question of whether there had been interbreeding between humans and Neanderthals, an issue that is still not resolved.

But researchers report that tests using an improved method of radiocarbon dating, based on a new way to exclude contaminants, show that most, and maybe all, Neanderthal bones in Europe are or will be found to be at least 39,000 years old. Thomas F. G. Higham, a specialist in radiocarbon dating at Oxford University, and Ron Pinhasi, an archaeologist at University College Cork in Ireland, have dated the bones of a Neanderthal child less than 2 years old whose remains were found in the Mezmaiskaya Cave in the northern Caucasus Mountains. A second Neanderthal baby, found in a lower layer in the cave, was previously dated back 29,000 years. full article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05 /10/science/10neanderthal.html



sincere1906

sincere1906

Four new species discovered may shed light on human evolution

Published: Saturday, Apr 23, 2011

The discovery of four individuals of a new species could shed light on human evolution. The discovery of the new species of early human, Australopithecus sediba by South African researchers has caused quite a stir among paleoanthropologists. The researchers said that the hominin shows some surprisingly modern traits and its species may even be an ancestor of our own genus.

"We really have found something very, very odd and very unexpected," Science Now quoted discovery team leader Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, as saying. But other paleoanthropologists are waiting for more detailed analysis of the still-unpublished fossils before they agree on its identity or place in the human family tree. According to new dates reported by Berger in his talk at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA), the four hominin individuals died when they fell into a "death trap" in a cave about two million years ago at Malapa, South Africa.

full article:

Four new species discovered may shed light on human evolution



sincere1906

sincere1906

What's 96 Percent of the Universe Made Of? Astronomers Don't Know

Clara Moskowitz, SPACE.com senior writer Date: 16 May 2011

All the stars, planets and galaxies that can be seen today make up just 4 percent of the universe. The other 96 percent is made of stuff astronomers can't see, detect or even comprehend. These mysterious substances are called dark energy and dark matter. Astronomers infer their existence based on their gravitational influence on what little bits of the universe can be seen, but dark matter and energy themselves continue to elude all detection.

"The overwhelming majority of the universe is: who knows?" explains science writer Richard Panek, who spoke about these oddities of our universe on Monday (May 9) at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) here in Manhattan. "It's unknown for now, and possibly forever."

Panek's new book, "The 4 Percent Universe" (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011), Panek recounts the story of how dark matter and dark energy were discovered. It's a history filled with mind-boggling scientific surprises and fierce competition between the researchers racing to find answers.

full article:

What's 96 Percent of the Universe Made Of?