WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

Posted

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 - 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.



However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco's 2001 'Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage', an agreement that extends International protection toshipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 - 1945), before they come under Unesco's protection.

Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/scie nce-environment-28056244

Wonderful New Year|Merry Christmas to every person

Posted

2014 can be complete along with we'd like in order to wish one along with all a wonderful Holidays as well as a Merry New Year

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

Posted

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 - 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco's 2001 'Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage', an agreement that extends International protection toshipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 - 1945), before they come under Unesco's protection.

Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/scie nce-environment-28056244

Lateral Communication meaning?

Posted

The term 'lateral communication' can actually mean (at least) two different things.

In the natural world, lateral communication occurs whenever a group of animals appear to exhibit a collective intelligence. For example, when a flock of birds turns at the exact same time, remaining in perfect formation, this is here. Other examples include shoals of fish acting in perfect synch, or the movements of ant colonies.

In the business world, however, the term 'lateral communication' denotes something else entirely. In modern business, lateral communication is all to do with hierarchy. An example of lateral communication occurs when two workers on the same level discuss ideas (e.g. a manager talking to a manager). Its opposite term, 'diagonal communication', occurs when communication is initiated between different levels of hierarchy (e.g. talking to your boss' boss, or your boss talking to you).

From Wikipedia:

"The term lateral communication can be used interchangeably as horizontal communication. In his text entitled "Organizational Communication," Michael J. Papa defines horizontal communication as "the flow of messages across functional areas at a given level of an organization" (Papa and Daniels 55). With this system people at the same level are permitted "to communicate directly without going through several levels of organization" (Papa and Daniels 55). Given this elasticity, members within an organization have an easier time with "problem solving, information sharing across different work groups, and task coordination between departments or project teams" (Papa and Daniels 56). The use of lateral or horizontal communication in the workplace "can also enhance morale and afford a means for resolving conflicts (Koehler et al., 1981) (Papa and Daniels 56)."

The pawns, on the other hand, can only converse one space at a time and only in one direction. Oh wait; I'm getting confused again!

I hope that helps you, Sarah-Jane. I am unsure as to which definition you were looking for, so I focussed on both. If you have any follow-up questions, drop me a line the usual way and I'll try to get back to you as soon as I can.

Want to get the original piece take a look here

Why Does One Earpiece Commonly Stop Functioning Before the Another?

Posted

There are many causes for the familiar (yet absurdly irritating) phenomenon. By and large, however, it's basically due to a loose wire which enable it to regularly be fixed by pushing the wire in the direction of the radio earpiece and, if needs be, fixing it into place with a bit of electrical tape, super glue, or some other adhesive.

Sometimes, if ever the earpieces have an inline volume turn, that may be the cause. That one is slightly trickier to repair, but you can always try the 'wire trick' mentioned above and see if it works. If not, then open the volume wheel and re-solder the cables into place (be warned, this will invalidate most warranties, so if ever the 'phones remain covered, just send 'em back and acquire replacements).

To avoid stuff like this occouring in the future, it's highly recommended to wrap your cables carefully and to avoid stressing your headphones. No, I don't mean you should give Motorhead a break and just play floaty, soothing New-Agey music on them, I mean you shouldn't have them inside your back pocket if you sit down and it is best to remove them warily from your ears after use (this will sound evident, but you'd be surprised how many people simply rip 'em out).

Another thing to look out for is the jack, if ever the cable is fraying/wearing around the jack, then that can also be a problem. Fortunately, like so many everything in life, a small amount of electrical tape can really come in helpful, just ensure that all of the copper wiring is tightly bound and it should go back to standard usage in no time.

Sometimes, however, it is simply an indication that the earpieces are knackered and no quantity of skillful tinkering can fix them. Usually, in these cases, the challenge is internal. This unique variant on the trouble also attacks headphones of any price range, be they Poundland specials or your year old Sennheiser Eargasm series. I am reminded of a Shakespeare quote from Hamlet, something about a king and the guts of an beggar, but I can not be bothered to look the entire thing up right now. You get the point I'm attempting to make though, everything dies eventually, regardless of how much it cost you.

you can find more information from this site here

Electric Buses Set to Arrive on Time

Posted

Eight experimental electric buses will be operating in Milton Keynes from late January onwards. The fleet will begin operating along the busy Number 7 route, which covers the 15 miles between Wolverton and Bletchley. They are the first electric buses to operate in the UK.

UK-based bus manufacturer Wrightbus have built these new electric buses in conjunction with Japanese company Mitsui and UK engineering group Arup.

Wireless 'booster' plates in the road, placed at the beginning/end of the route, give the buses a charge that allows them to operate for a full day. They are then charged overnight at the bus depot.

The buses will need to stop over the booster plates, before lowering the bus' own receiver plates and resting there for 10 minutes' charge time. The journey will then resume, exactly the same way a regular bus ride does.

The process is called 'inductive charging' and it involves electricity passing though wire coils in the plates that creates a magnetic field. The field then shares its voltage with the bus' receiver plates, charging them up.

Similar electric bus trials are being implemented in Italy, the Netherlands and Germany. In 2013, South Korea unveiled a 7.5-mile stretch of road, which recharges electric vehicles as they {you can find morehere, without requiring any charge time at all.

In an interview with the BBC, John Bint of Milton Keynes Council said, "Electric buses have huge potential and we're exploring how they can help us take better care of the environment without compromising passenger service,"

If these trial models prove to be successful, the Council plans to run them all across the town.

The environmental impact of this scheme is certainly considerable, with local councils potentially being able to significantly reduce their area's carbon footprint. In addition, the future development of electric buses can only help the similar evolution of the electric car, an invention that has the potential to seriously lower the world's carbon emissions.

Arup consultant John Miles who is also an engineering professor at Cambridge University, told BBC that, "These electric buses will be expected to do everything a diesel bus does (...) They will be operating on a demanding urban route, and that's all part of the trial's aim - to prove that electric buses can be tough as well as green."

you can find more info from this site here

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

Posted

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 - 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco's 2001 'Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage', an agreement that extends International protection to shipwrecks over 100 years old.



Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 - 1945), before they come under Unesco's protection.

Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/scie nce-environment-28056244

'New' Species of Mammal Discovered in South America

Posted

American Scientists from the Smithsonian Institute of Washington DC have discovered a new type of carnivorous mammal previously unknown to Western science.

The creature, known as the olinguito, is the first such animal to be discovered on the American continent in 35 years.

Zoologist Dr Kristofer Helgen, who works as the curator of mammals in Washington DC's National Museum of Natural History, discovered some stored remains in a Chicago museum and was reportedly 'stopped in his tracks' upon seeing them.

Following further examination, Helgen says that, "The skins were a rich red colour and when I looked at the skulls I didn't recognize the anatomy. It was different to any similar animal I'd seen, and right away I thought it could be a species new to science."

DNA testing eventually proved that, whilst the 35-cm long olinguito is a type of olingo (a relative of raccoons), it is definitely a distinct species in its own right. However, not content with simply describing the species from the remains, the real challenge for Helgen was to attempt to observe this new mammal in the wild.

Using educated guesswork and clues obtained from the specimen drawer, Dr. Helgen and his team were able to theorize a possible habitat for the olinguito. Their ideas proved to be correct and the animal has since been established as inhabiting a number of protected areas from Central Columbia to Western Ecuador.

This is not the first time that Dr. Helgen has identified new species by examining museum remains. In fact, throughout his distinguished career, he has discovered around 100 new species of animals. As an example, Helgen's work has demonstrated that the hog badger, presumed simply to be a single, widespread species, was in fact three different species, albeit with similar attributes.

Historical records show that Washington National Zoo actually had an olinguito specimen in the 1960's, but it was never identified as such. Theanimal was exhibited as an olinga, but its keepers were puzzled when it failed to breed. Sadly, the captive olinguito died without ever being correctly identified.

It should also be noted that just because an animal is considered 'new' to Western science, the term rarely denotes a species completely unknown to Humankind. People native to the areas inhabited by these animals are usually well aware of its presence and indispensable in locating individuals for observation and study by Western researchers.

A host of other new species have already been discovered this year, including the Cambodian tailorbird, a new type of hero shrew, a reef fish from the Caribbean, a beautifully patterned bat from the Sudan and two new spider species (including a grey and black tarantula the size of an open palm).

To Dr. Helgen, this is hardly surprising, "Conventional wisdom would have it that we know all the mammals of the world. In fact, we know so little. Unique species, profoundly different from anything ever discovered, are out there waiting to be found." He says.

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